Press release

Blues listeners crying over speeding fines

Monday 21 April 2008

  • Meat Loaf tops the list of favourite driving songs
  • Over three quarters listen to music whilst at the wheel
  • Blues lovers more likely to speed than rock and pop fans

Research by Saga Motor Insurance* has revealed that oldies are still the best with classic Meat Loaf named as the nations favourite driving song. However listeners to 'Bat out of Hell' are least likely to be caught driving like one. Instead the study exposes blues fans as statistically most likely to be caught speeding and listeners of country music as most likely to have an accident.

Topping the Saga chart of UK's favourite driving song was Meat Loaf's Bat out of Hell.

UK top driving songs:

1. Bat out of hell – Meat Loaf

2. Bohemian Rhapsody – Queen

3. Born to be wild – Steppenwolf

4. Don’t stop me now – Queen

5. Hotel California – The Eagles

Those most likely to utter "oops I did it again" and be caught speeding are not pop divas but drivers zipping along to Johnny Lee Hooker, as blues fans top the list with almost half (49%) having committed a speeding offence. Mild mannered country lovers are hot on their heels with 45% having been caught breaking the limit. Surprisingly, traditionally conservative easy listening followers are more likely to break the law and speed than followers of rock and pop.

The research revealed that over three quarters (79%) of the UK listen to music whilst in their cars. Drivers who listen to talk based radio stations or nothing are more focused on the road with only a fifth (22%) admitting to having had a minor accident, compared to over three quarters (78%) of those who listen to music. Fans of country music are most likely to have a bump or a scrape.

Most likely to be caught speeding:

1. Blues

2. Country

3. Reggae

4. Rap and hip hop

5= Classical

5= Easy listening

Most likely to have a minor accident:

1. Country

2. Classical

3. Easy listening

4. Reggae

5= Blues

5= Rock and pop

Rock and pop music is the most popular style of driving music with two thirds (65%) choosing it, closely followed by easy listening (39%), R&B and soul (24%) and classical (23%). However, as the research highlighted, having an increased number of adagios in your musical style doesn’t mean you are necessarily less likely to end up involved in an accident.

Andrew Goodsell, Chief Executive, Saga Group Ltd, said:

"Although the charts change on a weekly basis, the songs people prefer to listen to whilst driving are still the golden oldies. Interestingly, the research shows that although certain types of music are often thought of as having a relaxing effect on the listener, there is no proof that this results in a more tempered driving style. Whatever type of music people are tuned into behind the wheel, being careful about staying within the law is of the upmost importance."


Notes to Editors-

*Analysis carried out by Opinium Research on an online poll of 2,032 British adults between 6th and 10th April 2008.

For further press information please contact the Saga Press Office on: 01303 771529.



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