Would you still pass your driving test?

Carlton Boyce / 03 February 2016 ( 08 June 2018 )

If it's been years (or decades) since you passed your driving test, would you still pass it today? Take our motoring quiz below to find out if you could pass the theory test.



Drivers over 50 have no fear about being re-tested, as half say they are happy to take a driving test when they turn 70 to prove they are safe to be on the road, according to research by Saga Car Insurance.

The poll of more than 9,000 over-50s showed that six out of 10 think it’s a good idea to re-test people regularly when they reach a certain age; perhaps this is because they are confident they will pass.

Those under 50 years old are also in favour of re-testing older drivers (83%) and seven out of 10 younger drivers claim they would be happy to take another driving test when they reach 70.

Find out more about driving past your 70th birthday

Free driver confidence courses

The research also shows that around one in six over-50s have taken a break from driving for a variety of reasons. 

The most common reasons for taking a brief break from driving is because of illness, injury or operation (61%), if they didn’t need to drive because a partner did all the driving (19%) or because they didn’t have a car (12%). 

Another reason someone may give driving a break is if they have been injured in a road accident, knocking their confidence behind the wheel. That's why Saga Car Insurance offer a two-hour driver confidence course provided by the AA Driving School if you or the authorised driver are injured in an accident whilst driving your vehicle, if you've opted to take out Legal Protection when insuring your vehicle.

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Take the test

1. You are driving on a clear night. There is a steady stream of oncoming traffic. The national speed limit applies. Which lights should you use?

A. Full beam headlights

B. Dipped headlights

C. No lights

Answer: (highlight the text below to see the answer clearly)
B. Dipped headlights

2. Under what circumstances can you drive over a footpath?

A. To get into a property

B. If the road is too narrow and no one will give way

C. If there is nowhere else to park

Answer:
A. To get into a property

3. You are driving along a road that has a cycle lane. The lane is marked by a solid white line. This means that during its period of operation…

A. You must not drive in that lane

B. You can use that lane for parking your car

C. You may drive in that lane at any time

Answer: 
A. You must not drive in that lane

4. You get a puncture on the motorway. You manage to get your vehicle onto the hard shoulder. You should ...

A. Attempt to change your tyre quickly

B. Try to flag down other motorists to assist you

C. Use the emergency telephone and call for help

Answer: 
C. Use the emergency telephone and call for help

5. You're in collision with another moving vehicle. Someone is injured and your vehicle is damaged. What information should you find out?

A. The other driver’s name, address and telephone number

B. The occupation of the other driver

C. Whether the other driver is licensed to drive

Answer: 
A. The other driver’s name, address and telephone number

6. You are driving on a motorway. You have to slow down quickly due to a hazard. You should ...

A. Beep your horn to see if you can make other motorists clear a path for you

B. Switch on your hazard warning lights

C. Use the hard shoulder to speed round the hazard

Answer: 
B. Switch on your hazard warning lights

7. What should you do when parking your vehicle facing downhill?

A. Make sure the steering wheel is straight

B. Turn the steering wheel out towards the middle of the road

C. Turn the steering wheel towards the kerb

Answer: 
C. Turn the steering wheel towards the kerb

8. How old must you be to supervise a learner driver?

A. 18 years old

B. 20 years old

C. 21 years old

Answer: 
C. 21 years old

9. You are carrying two 13-year-old children and their parents in your car. Who is responsible for seeing that the children wear seat belts?

A. The driver

B. The parents

C. The child because they are older than 10

Answer: 
A. The driver

10. You are driving on a motorway. By mistake, you go past the exit that you wanted to take. You should ...

A. Stop and call for assistance

B. Carry on to the next exit

C. Reverse until you can turn into the slip road

Answer: 
B. Carry on to the next exit

11. You are turning left at a junction. Pedestrians have started to cross the road. You should ...

A. Beep your horn to alert them to your presence and continue turning

B. Continue as it is your right of way

C. Give way to them

Answer: 
C. Give way to them

12. You are driving in heavy rain. Your steering suddenly becomes very light. You should ..

A. Ease off the accelerator

B. Brake sharply

C. Steer in the opposite direction

Answer: 
A. Ease off the accelerator

13. You are taking drugs that are likely to affect your driving. What should you do?

A. Seek medical advice before driving

B. Drive anyway if you feel fine

C. Only drive for short distances

Answer: 
 A. Seek medical advice before driving

14. You're driving along a country road. A horse and rider are approaching. What should you do?

A. Beep your horn

B. Speed up to get past them as quickly as possible

C. Drive slowly past

Answer: 
C. Drive slowly past

15. You have broken down on a two-way road. You have a warning triangle. You should place the warning triangle at least how far from your vehicle?

A. 45 metres

B. 10 metres

C. 40 metres

Answer: 
A. 45 metres

 

How did you do? If you didn't fare so well, you might like to consider brushing up on your driving skills with an IAM course.

Carlton Boyce

If you enjoy Carlton's inimitable style of writing, you'll love his motoring column - to have each one delivered straight to your door every month, subscribe to Saga Magazine today!

Alternatively, you can buy his book How to Become a Motoring Journalist from the Saga Bookshop.





The opinions expressed are those of the author and are not held by Saga unless specifically stated.

The material is for general information only and does not constitute investment, tax, legal, medical or other form of advice. You should not rely on this information to make (or refrain from making) any decisions. Always obtain independent, professional advice for your own particular situation.