Top 6 free things to do in Rome

Jenai Laignel / 27 February 2016

Is it really possible to roam free in Rome? While there are plenty of things you can do in the romantic and culturally-rich city that can cost an arm and a leg, there's also an awful lot Rome has to offer that won't cost you a single Euro. Here's a brief run-down of a few of them:




1. Visit Scalinata di Spangna.

These Spanish steps extend from Piazza di Spagna to Trinita dei Monti church at the top. The widest staircase in Europe, these 138 steps are well worth climbing.

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2. Take a picture of the Colosseum.

You'd be mad to visit this iconic amphitheatre and not take a picture. This truly awe-inspiring building is begging to be photographed.


3. Visit an 'aperitif' bar.

The meaning of 'aperitif' has taken on a whole new slant in Italian culture. Although this isn't technically free, for the price of an aperitif (a pre-dinner drink) you also get to fill a plate with delicious finger foods – completely free of charge.


4. Marvel at Michelangelo's famous statue.

Head to San Pietro in Vincoli to witness one of Michelangelo's most well-known sculptures, created in the early 16th century.

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5. Have some time-out in the squares.

Rome is renowned for the sheer beauty of its squares, and enjoying the atmosphere of them is absolutely free. The most popular are Piazza Navona – with its stunning baroque fountains, and the regal marble floor of Piazza della Rotunda.


6. Stroll around Rome's neighbourhoods.

To get a real feel for the city, have a wander around the cobbled and narrow streets of Trastevere and Testaccio – home to a huge artificial mount, consisting of the fragments of broken amphorae (ancient Roman jar).


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