Boysenberry ice cream cake

Pavlova cake layers are almost exactly the same at room temperature as when frozen, except that in the cold they become a little firmer. This makes them ideal for an ice-cream sandwich, writes Genevieve Knights.

Preparation time

20 minutes

Cooking time

30 minutes


  • 4 egg whites
  • 240g caster sugar
  • 2 teaspoons white vinegar
  • 1 litre boysenberry ripple ice cream (or another flavour of your choice)


Use any of your favourite flavoured ice creams for this recipe and don't forget that brown-sugar pavlova layers work extremely well with caramel and chocolate-flavoured ice creams.

Pre-heat the oven to 150°C fan-bake setting. Draw 2 x 20cm in diameter circles with a ballpoint pen onto 2 sheets of non-stick baking paper.

In a large clean bowl, whip the egg whites until they form peaks. While continuing to whip, gradually rain in the 240g caster sugar. Then whip a further 8-10 minutes until all the sugar granules have dissolved.

Add the white vinegar then fold in with a metal spoon very gently until combined. Divide the meringue between the penned rings. Using a spatula or palette knife, work the mix to the edges of the rings to create even, flat discs. Holding the paper very taut, place the layers onto baking sheets. Place the baking sheets in the oven and bake for 5 minutes. Turn the heat down to 100°C and cook a further 30 minutes. Remove from the oven and leave to cool to room temperature.

Leave the ice cream to sit at room temperature for around 5 minutes. Remove the first cake layer from the paper and place on a serving plate. Place scoops of the ice cream evenly on top of the pavlova layer. Remove the second layer from its paper and place on top of the ice cream. Press down the layer gently to flatten the cake a little. Freeze until serving time.

Pavlova by Genevieve Knights is published by Accent Press, priced £7.99. 

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